Learn to Lucid Dream

Consider this: approximately a third of our life is spent asleep, and in an average lifetime we experience about half a million dreams. And yet for most of us that part of our existence is like a closed book - we might remember an occasional vivid dream, but usually our dreams are just vague, fragmented shadows that evaporate in our minds as soon as we open our eyes. So here's a new book from Daily Grail Publishing to help us all reclaim this 'lost' part of our lives, and what's more, get loads of enjoyment out of it: Lucid Dreaming, by Paul and Charla Devereux (available from Amazon US and Amazon UK). This updated and revised edition of their classic 1998 guidebook explains the history and nature of dreams and lucid dreams, and then presents a uniquely comprehensive range of techniques, tools and aids for attaining lucid dreaming yourself:

Forget your 3D cinema and TV, and your virtual cyber-worlds - these are but pale electronic imitations of what you can access through your own mind. Lucid DreamingThis book shows you how to dream lucidly, which means waking up inside dreams while still physiologically asleep. Lucid dreaming is a genuine altered state of consciousness, not merely vivid dreaming, in which you can find yourself in other realities that seem as real as waking consciousness. There is no limit to the creations you can explore, because the biological wonder that is your brain is the most complex thing we know of. You can have fun, meet departed friends and relatives as if they were still alive, rehearse actions you have to undertake in the normal world of daily reality, experience mystical and paranormal mind states, and much more.

Go grab a copy of Lucid Dreaming from Amazon US or Amazon UK and "live the dream"! Besides the personal benefit you'll gain from reading the book, each copy sold helps keep the Daily Grail up and running, so it's a win-win situation. And feel free to spread the word to friends!

(Note: If Amazon says the book is "temporarily out of stock", it's just a quirk in their system. They should be able to refill stock within 24 hours)

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Henry Baum's picture
Member since:
11 March 2010
Last activity:
1 year 2 weeks

Kindle edition in the works?

kamarling's picture
Member since:
26 June 2005
Last activity:
17 hours 46 min

I thought the name Charla Devereux was very familiar to me and indeed so it should be. I am a member of the Scientific and Medical Network and the newsletter I receive regularly is sent by Charla.

I'll certainly add this one to the list but I have quite a pile of books to wade through at the moment and I am a painfully slow reader.

Dave.

ashwattha's picture
Member since:
26 February 2009
Last activity:
27 weeks 2 days

I've been more or less into lucid dreaming for the past few years. I have Stephen LaBerge's manual (same title) and look forward to finding some new insights here!

I just got The Long Trip from Amazon too, great reading so far! Very happy to have independent publishers like the Grail putting this stuff out!

Omnis festinatio ex parte diaboli est

Rick MG's picture
Member since:
2 May 2004
Last activity:
1 day 8 hours

Nice synchronicity, I was thinking to myself last week that I'd like to find other people in my area interested in discussing dreaming and similar topics. Alas, I don't get much sleep these days, and narcolepsy isn't helping either (well, it would if I could have a nap when I need to, but I'm not George Costanza). Here are a few books I recommend from my bookshelf:

Lucid Dreaming by Robert Waggoner is one of the best you'll read on the topic. (Amazon US & UK)

The Secret History of Dreaming by Robert Moss is a classic and one of my 'desert island' books. His other books might seem too "New Age" to rationalist readers, but I'm a huge fan of Moss. (Amazon US & UK)

Dreaming in the World's Religions by Kelly Bulkeley. From ancient Egypt and India, to Australian Aboriginals and Celtic Europe, Bulkleley has compiled a terrific survey of dreaming traditions from all corners of the globe and added an interesting neuroscience spin to it. (Amazon US & UK)

Our Dreaming Mind by Robert Van De Castle covers the science of dreams, paranormal links, and everything in between. (Amazon US & UK)

The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche invites you to practice an ancient tradition of dreaming your way to enlightenment. (Amazon US & UK)

~ * ~

@levitatingcat

ashwattha's picture
Member since:
26 February 2009
Last activity:
27 weeks 2 days

I'm often skeptical of a lot of these new-agey topics books, but it sounds like I can trust that's a list of great reads that I'll be keeping an eye out for. Thanks!

Omnis festinatio ex parte diaboli est

Paolo's picture
Member since:
1 May 2004
Last activity:
1 week 4 days

A quick easy hack to help dreaming is to not drink alcohol the evening before and pop a couple of vitamin B Complex supplements about 3 hours before bed.

You will dream although at the cost of a good nights rest so really only do this on weekends when you are not driving or operating machinery the next day.

cheers Paolo