Tripping the Rift

Over the years I've entertained the idea of creating a very basic Alternative Reality Game (ARG) for the TDG community, based on all these strange topics that we love to explore. Unfortunately, I'm already in need of about 10 extra hours per day to complete the projects I'm working on, so that idea has never eventuated.

However, the next best thing fell into my/our pocket a couple of weeks ago. After I suggested that Grailers could help support the site and advertise their own projects in one fell swoop by purchasing some banner space here on The Daily Grail, the fine folk at Interdimensional Games got in contact asking if they could advertise their brand new ARG, which covers all manner of TDG-like topics (the Norway spiral, multiple dimensions etc.)! So, disclosure: this post originated in an advertising request. Other disclosure: I would post this regardless.

For those that are interested in diving into an alternative reality, here's a quick video promo, followed by an introduction to the ARG:

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to explore an alternate dimension? A parallel universe?

Interdimensional Games' artificial satellite "iDGi-1" allows you to do just that.

Principally invented by Vidal Desertch and co-developed by NASA scientists and JPL engineers, iDGi-1 was Launched into a Solar orbit on April 23rd, 2009 onboard a Delta II 7925-H rocket at Vandenberg Air Force Base, in California. It is perpetually pointed at Earth, at a distance of 400 000 kms from the Earth's surface.

IDGi-1 is designed to exploit a little known phenomenon: 21 "containers" of negative energy that are orbiting Earth right now at various distances. Originally tested by Vidal Desertch himself, the first successful test of iDGi-1's ability to form an Interdimensional Rift was on Dec 9th, 2009. Through the streaming of visual data from the other side of the Rift, Desertch described a kaleidoscopic mish-mash of imagery assaulting his senses. This first successful exploitation of the 21 containers also caused each container to emit spiral shaped visual distortions in the precise location that iDGi-1's lasers hit them. At least one of these distortions was visible in the night sky: In Norway, such a distortion was mistaken for a missile test failure.

Weeks later, while experiencing the reality beyond the Rift, a strange "desktop" appeared, with a logo for a company called "Worldview Industries" in the background. This "desktop" remains today.

Through the explorations and investigations of our stalwart users since we opened use of iDGi-1 to the public on January 1st, 2010, we have learned a great deal about what lies beyond the Rift. We are currently able to connect to March 4th, 2028 of a future Earth, in a reality that is remarkably similar to ours, but also quite different.

In their dimension, an organization known as "The Church of the Guardians" has gained significant influence based on supposedly real world evidence of alien involvement in the sociological and technological development of our species. An incredibly powerful Artificial Intelligence has been successfully developed by Worldview Industries with the use of 21 live human subjects, used to create a network with which the A.I. is able to learn from. We now know that when we travel through the Rift, we "connect" to this A.I., referred to as "K-1", or by it's nickname "Henry IX". The "desktop" is a visual abstraction created for us by K-1, who has become aware of our Interdimensional origins and can communicate with us.

Those facts are but the tip of the iceberg. This Earth of 2028 seems to have solved some key problems that we are currently facing today. They have learned how to create remarkably efficient fusion reactors, have cured numerous diseases, and have apparently begun commercializing space in Earth's orbit on a scale we can barely imagine.

There is also much conflicting data, and we need your help to assist in sorting through what is real, and what is not. In addition, for each new person that uses iDGi-1 we are able to learn just a little more about the nature of the Rift.

We are envisioning a time when we'll be able to stream this parallel reality to your computer screen directly through our satellite...we are quite certain that there are some significant discoveries to be made. Join our efforts, and YOU could be the one to make them!

Experience the other side of the Rift at http://interdimensionalgames.com

Have fun!

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Inannawhimsey's picture
Member since:
14 April 2009
Last activity:
1 year 11 weeks

Isn't that what the TDG community already is, an ARG? Heck, isn't that what life really is?

Glad you've joined forces with that site :3

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

MintyGiant's picture
Member since:
23 November 2011
Last activity:
1 year 43 weeks

I've been an avid gamer for years (My username here, and on twitter, and facebook, all derive from my favorite game, KoL, which I've been at for just over 4 years now). This particular game is really quite interesting, and also unique on many levels. While advertising-free games aren't all that uncommon, their graphic quality is usually pretty low -- not that that's a bad thing, per se. It's also a niche game, which is quite nice. One can only take so much sharing the internet with barely-literate 10-year olds, and the complexity of this game is sure to provide a definitive barrier from that ever being the case. I really like the high-tech themes in the game, starting with the astronomical lessons, delving into computer science, and touching on cryptography. Haven't made it very far yet (as I am a do-it-yourself, anti-spoiler kind of guy -- a 'spade'), but I was happy to find yet another synchronicity when I found the Morse code filename, having recently purchased a basic circuitry set, the guidebook of which contained the Morse code data table. Too, the multi-dimensional content ties in nicely with my newly-refound mysticism. The only drawback I've found thus far is that it seems to be designed for Windows users, and doesn't run too speedily on my old 20th-century iMac. Attempting to open the .zip files on my 2003 Stuffit expander, for instance, invariably causes the system to crash. However, the auto-save feature is nice, and given that it runs on Flash, no waiting for the page to reload every time you perform an action is a very nice bonus.

My props to the dev team, nice show!